Temporary Exhibition

 Alan Shuptrine: Appalachian Watercolors of the Serpentine Chain on view in the Changing Gallery 

An exhibition entitled, Alan Shuptrine: Appalachian Watercolors of the Serpentine Chain, is currently on view in the State Museum's Changing Gallery. The exhibition pays tribute to the land and people found along the Appalachian Trail, and of the Celtic culture that can still be found there.

Shuptrine, nationally recognized for his paintings, has created 54 watercolors for a body of work that celebrates the connections of our Appalachian mountains, and their historical and cultural counterparts in the British Isles. Also renowned for his 30-year-career of handcrafting and carving beautiful frames, Shuptrine embeds precious Serpentine stones, and uses gold leaf accents on this collection of frames. 

“This journey highlights Celtic traditions that were brought to America in the 18th century, and are still being practiced today,” Shuptrine remarked. “I tried to capture the deep, meaningful, and superb technical excellence in each painting, whether it is found in the Maine and Vermont tradition of quilt making in the clapboard white schoolhouse, to whiskey making and farming traditions, or stunning views across the mountain ranges. Without knowledge or appreciation for your past, and with no sense of place, how can you look to the future?Shuptrine went on state.

Alan Shuptrine, son of the late nationally-renowned artist Hubert Shuptrine, is partnering with New York Times best-selling author Sharyn McCrumb.  Together, they will create a book called, The Serpentine Chain, a large format art book which will explore and celebrate the connections between the people of Appalachia and their historical and cultural counterparts in the British Isles.Included in the exhibition are nine paintings by Hubert Shuptrine, Alan’s father. Born in Chattanooga in 1936, Hubert began his artistic career working as an abstract oil painter. In 1970, after a family vacation to Maine, he began to work in watercolor and was self-taught in the medium.  In 1974 he collaborated with author James Dickey on a book entitled Jericho: The South Beheld. In his second book  —  Home to Jericho, which he both wrote and illustrated, he explored the south again. Hubert Shuptrine died in 2006, but his ethereal images of the South are still a beloved testament to the region.

Alan Shuptrine: Appalachian Watercolors of the Serpentine Chain will be on view through October 1, 2017, in the Changing Galleries. This will be the final temporary exhibition held at this location. It is free to the public.

Top Image: Alan Shuptrine, Into the Clearing, 2013, drybrush watercolor
Bottom Image: Hubert Shuptrine, Twin Chimneys, 1978, watercolor on paper. Tennessee State Museum Collection.
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me