Gospel

I Have A Voice Intro

Spirituals

The Blues

Gospel

From Blues to Blue Suede Shoes

Soul

Who Can Sing the Blues

 

 

 

Lucie E. Campbell (1885-1963), about 1940
Photo courtesy of Pink Palace Museum
 
 
Black gospel music, recognized as a distinct style by the 1920s, traced its roots to the spiritual tradition. Pioneered by Pastor C. E. Tindley as a tool to promote hope and faith during segregation, the style was notably shaped by Lucie E. Campbell of Memphis. A respected educator and music director for the National Baptist Convention, USA, many of her songs became standards, recorded by artists from Mahalia Jackson to Johnny Cash.
 
45 rpm record, Dixie Nightengales,
By World War II, vocal groups like Nashville’s Fairfield Four and the Spirit of Memphis Quartet helped popularize gospel music. By the 1950s, the black-owned Nashboro Records, affiliated with Ernie’s Record Mart on Jefferson Street, became a major gospel producer. An exciting musical genre, the form impacted popular secular music and protest songs of the Civil Rights Movement.
33 rpm record album, The Nashville Sit-Ins Story, 1960
 
This record contains popular music of the Civil Rights movement. 2010.142.1
 
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me