Soul

I Have A Voice Intro

Spirituals

The Blues

Gospel

From Blues to Blue Suede Shoes

Soul

Who Can Sing the Blues

 

 

 

By the 1960s, the rise of soul music – a mix of black gospel, rhythm and blues, and jazz – correlated with non-violent resistance of the Civil Rights Movement. Like protest dynamics, soul was emotional and empowering, concentrating on groove and energetic vocals.
 
Despite Motown’s unmatched success, Tennessee soul music industries were serious rivals. Nashville’s black-owned Excello label produced powerful regional artists, attracting involvement from country music entrepreneurs.   
Carla Thomas, 1964, taken from the Tennessee A & I University (later Tennessee State) Tennessean yearbook. 
Carla Thomas, 1964, taken from the Tennessee A & I University
(later Tennessee State) Tennessean yearbook. 
 
Thomass 1961 hit Gee Whiz”​ on Satellite Records, STAXs original name, ensured the labels future success. 2008.242.1
 
 
In Memphis, Stax, Hi and Goldwax cultivated local and national soul talent, backed by racially integrated musical teams united by the love of music. Sadly, after Dr. King’s assassination in 1968, this integrated quality faced challenges. Still, Stax and Hi remained relevant soul and funk producers well into the 1970s.
 
“I had never, ever heard it the way I heard it in Memphis. This was back to the sanctified church. The music was so powerful that I literally cried.” 
– Don Davis, producer/writer, Stax Records
 
 
 
45 rpm record, The Mar-Keys,
STAX Records artists, 2005 Photograph by Jed DeKalb, courtesy of State of Tennessee Photographic Services
STAX Records artists, 2005
Photograph by Jed DeKalb,
courtesy of State of Tennessee Photographic Services
 
 
From left to right: Donald Duck Dunn, Isaac Hayes, and Steve Cropper, after receiving their Governors Awards for Excellence in the Arts in Nashville. All three were part of the legendary STAX records writing and production team as well as achieving success as STAX recording artists.
  Knoxvilles Clifford Curry, whose hits included
“​She Shot a Hole in My Soul
 in 1967, performs at Centennial Park
in Nashville, backed by Wade Conklin, Buzz Cason
and Mac Gayden.
  Knoxville's Clifford Curry,  Courtesy of Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Courtesy of Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
 
 
The Marigolds at the Tennessee State Prison, 1955, 2013.78.6
The Marigolds at the Tennessee State Prison, 1955, 2013.78.6
 
45 rpm record, The Marigolds,
The Marigolds, a reformation of the group the Prisonaires, were one of several doo-wop groups formed at the Tennessee State Prison in the 1950s. The Prisonaires were the best known of these groups, recording for Sam Phillips at Sun Records.
Rufus Thomas, about 2000 Photograph by Murray Lee, courtesy of State of Tennessee Photographic Services
Rufus Thomas, about 2000
Photograph by Murray Lee,
courtesy of State of Tennessee Photographic Services
 
 
Ike and Tina Turner, about 1965
Courtesy of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center/Tina Turner Museum
 
 
 
 
Ike and Tina Turner, about 1965 Courtesy of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center/Tina Turner Museum
Nutbush, Tennessee native Tina Turner, 2008 Courtesy of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center/Tina Turner Museum
Nutbush, Tennessee native Tina Turner, 2008
Courtesy of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center/Tina Turner Museum
 
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me