Who Can Sing the Blues

I Have A Voice Intro

Spirituals

The Blues

Gospel

From Blues to Blue Suede Shoes

Soul

Who Can Sing the Blues

 

 

 

According to radio personality and blues spokesman Big Bill Hill, “Now if you never had no problem, if you were born rich, everything you wanted was at your fingertips, you don’t really dig the blues. You don’t really feel it. There’s thousands of American people born with no hurt, go to college, big cars, big money, you have no right to sing the blues unless your woman quits you. A woman makes a man sing the blues.”
Howlin' Wolf (1910-1976)
Howlin Wolf (1910-1976)
Sam Phillips, who recorded Wolf in the early 1950s at Sun Records, claimed, “When I heard Howlin’ Wolf, I said, This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies.” Wolf, with his powerful, booming voice went on to become one of the best known blues artists, thanks in part to the Rolling Stones recording of his song, “Little Red Rooster,” in 1964. Courtesy of Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum
Clifford Curry, about 1967
Courtesy Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound
 
 
 
Clifford Curry, about 1967 Courtesy Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound
DeFord Bailey, born in Smith County, was a black harmonica virtuoso who could imitate a creaking hen, a speeding locomotive, or a contented lover with his instrument.
 
The first black and a featured performer on the Grand Ole Opry radio broadcast, he was a favorite among white listeners. 
 
Courtesy of Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum
Will Shade playing the “​bullfiddle, 1960s
 
Photograph by F. Jack Hurley, 2011.2014
 
Will Shade playing the
The Memphis Jug Band, formed in the 1920s, had a constantly changing membership and was one of the most popular jug bands. They often played on Beale Street in the 1920s and 1930s, and also at the Peabody Hotel. Band leader Will Shade played guitar, harmonica and bullfiddle – an upright bass made from a garbage can, a broom handle and a string.
 
 
 
Country bluesman and Memphian Walter
Country bluesman and Memphian Walter “​Furry”​ Lewis performing, 1971
Photograph by Barney Sellers, Memphis Commercial Appeal, 2015.168.2
 
 
 
 
Memphis jazz and blues pianist
Robert
Honeymoon Garner performing at a local club, 1967.
 
Garner was also a WDIA DJ and studied music
at Manassas High School.
 
Photograph by F. Jack Hurley, 2011.2014
Memphis jazz and blues pianist Robert
 Reverend Robert T. Wilkins at his church in Memphis, 1967 Wilkins quit playing blues after witnessing a murder while playing in 1936 and joined a church. He was
Reverend Robert T. Wilkins at his church in Memphis, 1967
 
Photograph by F. Jack Hurley, 2011.2014
Wilkins quit playing blues after witnessing a murder while playing in 1936 and joined a church. He was rediscovered” during the folk revival of the 1960s.
 
 
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me
Tennessee State Museum
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1120
FREE ADMISSION
 
Open: Tuesday - Saturday:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Closed: Mondays and four holidays: New Year's Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
(615) 741-2692
TOLL-FREE: 800-407-4324
museuminfo@tnmuseum.org

 

 

 

 
 
tn4me